SOUTHEN SLAVERY



A cornshucking Library of Congress.jpg

A flogging Library of Congress.jpg

A former slave family outside their cabin during the 1870s in Florida. Courtesy Photographic Collection, Florida State, Archives.jpg

A hog killing on farm of William Means's family, Houston County Courtesy of Georgia Department of Archives and History.jpg

A slave sales receipt from Tallahassee, dated September 17, 1862 Tallahassee, located in Leon County and founded in the 1820s as Floridas c.jpg

Abraham escaped from slavery and became the trusted adviser of the Seminole chief Micanopy. Florida State Archives.jpg

Abraham or Abram Grant, who later served as a bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, lived his childhood as a Columbia County slav.jpg

An 1850s drawing of a Florida delegation consisting of Seminoles and Black Seminoles. Left to right Billy Bowlegs, florida state archives.jpg

An antebellum Tallahassee street scene during the 1830s showing slaves in Middle Florida's plantation belt Some bond servants worked in the.jpg

An artist's representation of John Horse, also called John Cavallo or Gopher John John Horse emerged florida state archivesi.jpg

An early twentieth-century representation of blacks and Seminoles together in Florida. Courtesy Photographic Collection, Florida State Archiv.jpg

Anderson and Ballard Brickyard, Macon Courtesy of Georgia Department of Archives and History.jpg

Archaeologists discovered this handmade eighteenth century St Christopher's medal at the site of the Gracia Real de Santa Teresa de Mose nea.jpg

As was true of a number of the Tampa Bay area African American pioneers shown in this 1923 photograph, ties of family and place held many fre.jpg

Ben Bruno, like Abraham, served the Seminoles as an interpreter. Where Abraham also advised the chief Micanopy, fl states archives.jpg

Blount House, Jones County, built in 1847 Historic American Buildings Survey, Library of Congress.jpg

Commonly the assemblage of pots, bottles, and other material objects also marked black graves. Courtesy Photographic Collection, Florida Sta.jpg

Corrie Davis, son of bond servant Rachel Davis and cattleman John Parker. Courtesy Canter Brown Jr.jpg

Crawford County Courthouse, built in 1851 Historic American Buildings Survey, Library of Congress.jpg

Dorcas Bryant arrived in the Tampa Bay area during the mid 1850s from the vicinity of Albany, Georgia. With her came sons Aaron, Berry, Peter.jpg

Ellen Craft in the disguise worn when she escaped from slavery Reprinted from Craft, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom.jpg

Ells and Laney Grocery, Macon Courtesy of Georgia Department of Archives and History.jpg

Florida cow man John Parker and his slave Rachel Davis This photograph is of Rachel's daughter, Eliza Davis Allen, who was born in Polk Coun.jpg

Hoeing cotton, Jones County Courtesy of Georgia Department of Archives and History.jpg

In addition to whipping intransigent slaves, many owners punished them by forcing them to sit or stand in stocks. The punishment cont.jpg

In Florida, especially what became known as Middle Florida, cotton emerged as the cash crop of choice during the antebellum era. Its cultiva.jpg

John Finlayson became one of the largest slaveholders in Middle Florida, holding 185 or more slaves by the early 1860s. Here is a receipt for.jpg

Jones County Jail, built by Jacob Hutchings in 1842 Courtesy of Georgia Department of Archives and History.jpg

Juan Garrido, a free African-born explorer, participated in the Indian wars in Hispaniola and accompanied Juan Ponce de Leon in the discovery.jpg

Lewis Hicks, a slave of the Robert Hendry family, helped to pioneer today's Hardee County Courtesy Canter Brown Jr.jpg

Log cabin in the forests of Georgia Library of Congress.jpg

Material conditions for slaves varied from region to region in Florida and over time Enslaved blacks on Zephaniah Kingsley's Duval County es.jpg

Most of Florida's enslaved blacks lived in log cabins of one sort or another The one shown here, although the photograph was taken a.jpg

One of the most common forms of punishment for slaves in Florida was whipping. Here an overseer is attacking a woman with a paddle. Enslaved.jpg

Onetime slave Creasy Lloyd of Narcoossee in Osceola County reportedly lived almost to one hundred years of age. Courtesy Photographic Collect.jpg

Picking cotton, Jones County Courtesy of Georgia Department of Archives and History.jpg

Robert Meacham, the mulatto son of Dr. Banks Meacham of Gadsden County, later distinguished himself as a public official and African Methodis.jpg

Selina Rollins lived in the Alachua County Florda State Archives.jpg

Slave apartment over outdoor kitchen, rear of Slade House, Macon, built ca. 1827 Historic American Buildings Survey, Library of Congress.jpg

Slave women often performed the same fieldwork as men, as evidenced by this photograph of a Leon County woman plowing with an ox during the.jpg

Slaves played the banjo or fiddle at social gatherings of both whites and blacks. This tradition survived slavery, as indicated by the tunes .jpg

Some slaves in all areas of Florida either received encouragement or otherwise were permitted to tend their own gardens. Aunt Aggie Jones of.jpg

Some slaves maintained African names, as indicated in this 1842 Leon County sales advertisement. Courtesy Photographic Collection, Fl.jpg

Sometimes horses, mules, or oxen were not available for plowing. In such cases, as suggested by this photograph taken after emancipation, sla.jpg

Stella Meacham, wife of Robert Meacham. Courtesy Canter Brown Jr..jpg

The free black village of Gracia Real de Santa Teresa de Mose sat two miles north of St. Augustine as late as 1763.jpg

The process of cotton culture depended on slaves performing numerous chores, including gathering, ginning, packing, and shipping the crops. A.jpg

The Reverend James Page became the first black ordained minister of Florida and the first pastor of the Bethel Missionary Baptist Church in T.jpg

These four Hillsborough County pioneers had survived slavery and attained at least ninety years of age when this photograph was taken in 1923.jpg

Thomas Warren Long escaped from Duval County to fight for freedom during the Civil War, preaching the gospel to fellow soldiers when he could.jpg

Weaving white-oak baskets, Jones County Courtesy of Georgia Department of Archives and History.jpg

William Blackstone Johnston House, Macon, completed in 1860 Courtesy of Georgia Department of Archives and History.jpg